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28th May 2021

By JING Tea

How To Make Cold-Infused Tea

As well as the drink being refreshingly cold, making a cold infusion from your tea leaves will give you a different concentration of flavours from your tea compared to when you make it hot.

How To Make A Cold Infusion From Tea

Cold brew tea

Cold brew tea

Your cold infusion will be lighter – you might even call it understated – but if you choose the right tea, it’ll be very aromatic. This is because cold water brings out less of the structure – including tannin – from your leaves. Less structure means more space in your drink for the lighter flavours and high notes or aromas to show themselves. If you want to explore some of the more subtle flavours in teas, such as easily finding the floral “orchid” flavour in a Phoenix Honey Orchidoolong tea, or getting citrus refreshment from the bergamot in Earl Grey, a cold infused version will help with that. Read on for our simple guide on how to make a cold infusion from tea.

We also made a short video tutorial which you can find here.

https://jingtea.com/journal/refreshing-cold-infusions

What is Cold Infused Tea?

It’s the method of making tea that uses time instead of heat to extract flavour from tea leaves. It’s as simple as adding cold water to your tea leaves and leaving them in the fridge for two to eight hours.

When To Drink Cold Infused Tea

It’s perfect on a hot day – when you want a cool, light and refreshing drink. With its naturally sweet and aromatic character cold infused tea makes a great alternative to soft drinks. With a cold infused tea you’ll get only water and tea leaves – no sugar needed. If you want maximum natural sweetness and refreshment, try cold infusing our Pineapple and Chamomile Herbal Infusion or Jasmine Silver Needle White Tea.

The complexity of flavours that certain teas offer make cold infusions a satisfying aperitif. If you want surprise, intrigue and complexity try our Wuyi Oolong or Yunnan Gold.

Is Cold Infused Tea Good For You?

Like all cups of tea, your cold infusion will be hydrating – it’s made up of mostly water afterall.

When you’re using high quality whole tea leaves to make your drink it’ll be completely natural too – nothing artificial added and there’s no need to add sugar.

Cold Infusion Recipes

We would recommend trying cold infusions with the following teas:

Sencha
Sencha

ML

1litre

G

18g

°C

 10°C

Time

2.5 Hours
red dragon cold infsued
Red Dragon

ML

1litre

G

18g

°C

 10°C

Time

4 Hours*
Jasmine-Silver-Needle-Loose-Leaf-White-Tea
Jasmine Silver Needle

ML

1litre

G

18g

°C

 10°C

Time

4 Hours
Cold Infused Earl Grey
Earl Grey

ML

1litre

G

22g

°C

 10°C

Time

4 Hours*
Phoenix-Honey-Orchid-Loose-Leaf-Oolong-Tea
Phoenix Honey Orchid

ML

1litre

G

16g

°C

 10°C

Time

4 Hours

Best Teaware for Cold Infusions

  1. JING Two Cup Tea-iere for Loose Leaf tea
    Quick Add
  2. One Litre Tea-iere - Infusion - Teaware - JING Tea
    Quick Add
    £41.00
  3. Teacanter with Black Tea Infusion
    Quick Add
    TeawareTeacanter
    £41.00

3 Comments

  1. Susanna Jacks
    2020-09-15 11:18:52
    Thank you - enjoying jade sword cold infusion . Presumably you can make a second cold infusion With the leaves - as well as using for a hot infusion later in the day ?
  2. Olivia Cox
    2020-09-18 10:59:43
    Hi Susanna. Thank you for getting in touch, we're so happy to hear you're enjoying cold infusions. In answer to your question, we would recommend using fresh leaves for a second infusion as the leaves will have been infusing for a long time when making it cold, so a subsequent hot infusion would not have much florality or high notes left. If you like cold infused Jade Sword, we would also recommend experimenting with cold infused Sencha. Let us know if you have any other questions. The JING Team
  3. Andrews Ethel
    2020-10-13 13:28:46
    As with cold-brew coffee, cold-brew tea is all about making an infused concentrate and then diluting it just before drinking it. So I use 4 cups of water so that the chilling mix will take up less space in my refrigerator. If you would rather cut out the middle man and steep the tea in your serving pitcher (in which case you ll need 8 cups of water), feel free. I like to let it go between 8 and 12 hours, but if you leave it for as much as 48 hours it will still be fine. That s the brilliance of cold brew—even when steeped over a long period of time, the tea will stay smooth and refreshing until you have time to tend to it.